Going shopping on an empty stomach

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I remember grocery shopping with my mom while growing up, armed with a delicious, dense, almond-filled pastry called fyrstekake from the bakery.

When I bought Beatrice Ojakangas’ The Great Scandinavian Baking Book this summer, the first recipe I decided to try was the Norwegian Prince’s Cake. A simple, easy cake with an almond filling, it sounded wonderful. Little did I realize at first that I was looking at a recipe for fyrstekake. (Never mind the fact that the Norwegian name was in parentheses directly under the English one.)

Scandinavians must be born with a taste for almond in their genes. Growing up, some of my favorite sweets involved almond. Closer to my heart than fyrstekake is kringle, an almond- and raisin-filled, pretzel-shaped pastry. And don’t get me started on marzipan candy!

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Fyrstekake with Rosé-Poached Nectarines
Cake recipe adapted from The Great Scandinavian Baking Book

While planning a dessert to bring to a dinner with friends recently, I decided to bake this traditional Norwegian cake. But I wanted to give the dessert my own touch. As promised, here’s the recipe. Nectarines pair nicely with the cake’s almond flavor and add some moisture and contrasting texture to the dense, dry cake.  I kept the poaching liquid very simple in order to let the flavor of the frystakake shine without overwhelming it or adding too many flavors. But if you’d like, a little cinnamon might be a nice touch.

Despite the decorative crisscross pattern, this is a very simple cake that doesn’t require an artist’s touch. If you keep that in mind while forming the crust, you’ll be just fine, and you’ll spare yourself the frustration when the crust inevitably breaks or does something you don’t want it to do.

Despite the cake’s dryness, it keeps surprising well. Serve leftover cake the next day with coffee.

1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
½ cup sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ cup and 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, chilled and cut into slices
1 egg
1 cup whole almonds, unblanched
1 cup powdered sugar
2 egg whites
almond extract, to taste (optional)
wine-poached nectarines (recipe follows)
vanilla ice cream, for serving

Equipment: food processor, 9-inch springform cake pan

Sift the flour, sugar, and baking powder into a food processor. Add butter and combine; it will quickly develop the consistency of sand. Add one egg, and process until the mixture comes together into a dough. Wrap in plastic wrap and chill while making the filling.

Clean and dry the food processor. (You do not need to wash it; rinsing it in warm water and removing the bits of dough will suffice.) In the same bowl, use the food processor to finely chop the almonds. (Be warned, this is surprisingly loud!) The almonds will still have a rough consistency, which is okay; you’ll get a sense of when they’re ready. Add the powdered sugar and two egg whites, and process until combined. Taste the filling; it will have a delicate almond flavor, much softer than  marzipan. If you wish to have a more pronounced almond flavor, you might want to try adding a little almond extract to taste. Then cover the food processor bowl and refrigerate. (At this point, you may leave the dough and filling to chill for awhile, or proceed to assemble the cake. However, the dough may benefit from a little time in the refrigerator, as it should help it become more workable.)

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Using 2/3 to 3/4 of the dough, create the bottom layer of dough. Feel free to simply press it into the bottom and sides of the pan (you’ll want it to go up to about 3/4 of the sides), or, roll it out on a floured board into a circle about 10 1/2 to 11 inches in diameter, then press it into the pan. The important thing to remember is that the crust doesn’t have to be perfect; this is a rustic-looking dessert. Once the bottom crust is ready, spoon the almond filling in and spread it evenly onto the crust. Roll the rest of the dough out onto a floured board and cut it into 1/2-inch strips, then arrange them on the filling in a crisscross pattern. Once again, resist the temptation to make them perfect. The dough will easily break when you’re lifting the strips from the board; it helps to take a flat utensil and run it between the board and dough to loosen it, then lift it up gently. If it breaks, just put it back together like a puzzle. Bake, uncovered, for approximately 30 minutes, until the crust is golden.

One the cake cools, cut into slices, and serve with nectarines and ice cream. Drizzle a little of the reduced wine sauce on top of each slice and serve.

Serves 8-10

Rosé-Poached Nectarines

2 nectarines
1 cup rosé*
1 tablespoons sugar

While the cake is baking, prepare the nectarines. Cut them into eighths, and put them in a saucepan with the rosé. Bring to a boil, then simmer for approximately ten minutes, or until cooked, but still al dente. Stir frequently, turning the nectarine slices over to make sure they’re cooked evenly. Don’t be afraid if they lose their skin; most of it will inevitably  fall off. When the nectarines are cooked, remove them with a slotted spoon, and discard the skin. Reduce the wine sauce, stirring frequently, until it turns into a thin, jammy syrup.

*While I used rosé, white wine would probably have very similar results. I happened to have an open rosé in the fridge. The important thing is that you use an inexpensive wine, but one that you enjoy drinking, because the nectarines are the stars here.

You may want to double the nectarine recipe, depending on how many servings you need. I made it to serve four, but come to think of it, it could easily have served 6-8.

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4 thoughts on “Going shopping on an empty stomach

  1. That does look just scrumptious! Now that we are heading toward winter I just might give baking a try again…. might burn down the kitchen in the process….

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